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In many of our urban areas, health-care facilities rank with the best in countries like the US and the UK. But problems start cropping up as you move away from the cities and deeper into rural India.

The total spending on health care in India is about INR 10,200 ($157) per capita, or 4 per cent of GDP, of which only about 25 per cent (INR 2,600) is contributed by the government. These figures are lower than even those of most Sub-Saharan African countries. © Shutterstock
The total spending on health care in India is about INR 10,200 ($157) per capita, or 4 per cent of GDP, of which only about 25 per cent (INR 2,600) is contributed by the government. These figures are lower than even those of most Sub-Saharan African countries.

In many of our urban areas, health-care facilities rank with the best in countries like the US and the UK. But problems start cropping up as you move away from the cities and deeper into rural India. Despite over six decades of effort, the Indian government - and voluntary organisations working in the field - have not been able to reduce the disparity between health-care facilities in big cities and those in remote areas. But now, technological advancements hold out some hope

Robyn Norton, Principal Director, Professor of Global Health and James Martin Professorial Fellow, University of Oxford, and Professor Vivekananda Jha, Executive Director of George Institute of Public Health, India, share their thoughts in a new article: "Health For All: Looking Back to Plan for the Future." published by Business Today.

Download article here 

 Norton 

Robyn Norton, Principal Director                                                              Professor Vivekananda Jha, Executive Director 

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