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Until just a few decades ago, raised blood pressure was regarded as a benign and natural process of ageing that did not warrant treatment.

Professor Kazem Rahimi, Director of the George Institute comments in the Lancet that effective control of raised blood pressure requires collaborative, multi-sectoral, national efforts to improve implementation of available evidence. The failure to tackle this issue more decisively will come at a high cost, particularly to disadvantaged individuals and societies.

The clear view of recent achievements, as provided by the NCD Risk Factor Collaboration, should help us to collectively steer the action plan more effectively and equitably towards decreasing blood pressure globally.

 

notes:

Published Online November 15 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140673616321675

 

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