Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.
Skip to main content

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Objective</jats:title> <jats:p>To describe associations of body composition, physical activity and physical performance with knee cartilage thickness and subchondral bone area in young adults.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Methods</jats:title> <jats:p>Body composition, physical activity and physical performance were measured 4–5 years prior to knee MRI. Cartilage thickness and bone area were measured quantitatively from MRI. Associations were assessed using linear regression analysis, with mediators being identified using mediation analysis.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Results</jats:title> <jats:p>Participants (n = 186) were 31–41 years of age when the MRI was acquired and 48% were female. Greater lean mass was positively associated with cartilage thickness [β = 6.52 μm/kg (95% CI 0.86, 12.18)] and bone area [β = 13.37 mm2/kg (95% CI 5.43, 21.31)]. Physical performance measures were positively associated with cartilage thickness [long jump: β = 2.44 μm/cm (95% CI 0.70, 4.18); hand grip strength: 7.74 μm/kg (95% CI 1.50, 13.98); physical work capacity: 1.07 μm/W (95% CI 0.29, 1.85)] and bone area [long jump: β = 3.99 mm2/cm (95% CI 0.64, 7.34); hand grip strength: 19.06 mm2/kg (95% CI 7.21, 30.92); leg strength: 3.18 mm2/kg (95% CI 1.09, 5.28); physical work capacity: 3.15 mm2/W (95% CI 1.70, 4.60)]. Mediation analysis suggested these associations were mediated by lean mass (effect mediated: 27–95%).</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Conclusion</jats:title> <jats:p>Greater lean mass and better physical performance measured 4–5 years prior were associated with greater knee cartilage thickness and subchondral bone area in young adults, and the associations of physical performance were largely mediated by lean mass. These findings suggest lean mass may play an important role in maintaining knee joint health in young adults.</jats:p> </jats:sec>

Original publication

DOI

10.1093/rheumatology/kez498

Type

Conference paper

Publisher

Oxford University Press (OUP)

Publication Date

25/10/2019