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Objectives. The aim of this study, a substudy of the Australia-New Zealand trial of carvedilol in palients with heart failure due to ischemic heart disease, was to determine the effects of this treatment on left ventricular size and function with the use of quantitative two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography. Background. Beta-adrenergic blocking drugs have been shown to improve left ventricular ejection fraction in patients with heart failure due to either ischemic heart disease or idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. However, the effects of such treatment on left ventricular size remain uncertain. Methods. One hundred twenty-three patients from 10 centers in New Zealand and Australia participated in the 2D echocardiographic substudy. Echocardiography was performed before randomization and was repeated after 6 and 12 months of treatment. Left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were measured from apical four- and two-chamber views with the use of a modified Simpson's rule method. Results. After 12 months, heart rate was 8 beats/min lower in the carvedilol than in the placebo group, whereas left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were increased in the placebo group but reduced in the carvedilol group. At 12 months, left ventricular end-diastolic volume index was 14 ml/m2 less in the carvedilol than in the placebo group (p = 0.0015); left ventricular end-systolic volume index was 15.3 ml/m2 less (p = 0.0001), and left ventricular ejection fraction was 5.8% greater (p = 0.0015). Conclusions. In patients with heart failure due to ischemic heart disease, carvedilol therapy for 12 months reduced left ventricular volumes, increased left ventricular ejection fraction and prevented progressive left ventricular dilation. These changes demonstrate a beneficial effect of carvedilol on left ventricular remodeling in heart failure. The observed changes may explain in part the improved clinical outcomes produced by treatment with carvedilol.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/S0735-1097(97)00012-0

Type

Journal article

Journal

Journal of the American College of Cardiology

Publication Date

01/04/1997

Volume

29

Pages

1060 - 1066