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Executive Director of The George Institute, UK, Professor Terry Dwyer has been awarded an honorary doctorate by Trinity College Dublin for his extensive work in child health.

Executive Director of The George Institute, UK, Professor Terry Dwyer has been awarded an honorary doctorate by Trinity College Dublin for his extensive work in child health.

On their website, Trinity College wrote:

“The preeminent Australian medical researcher, Professor Terence Dwyer, renowned for his work on Sudden Infant Death Syndrome was awarded a Doctor in Science.  He is a Professor of epidemiology and his seminal research carried out on the positioning of infants during sleep led to the revision of the international recommendations with a consequent significant reduction in cot deaths. 

“He has received the highest honours from his native Australia for this research, which is considered one of the most significant medical advances of the twentieth century. Now at the University of Oxford where he heads up the George Institute for Global Health he is currently leading a major global research study on childhood cancer.”

Prof Dwyer is the Principal Investigator of the International Childhood Cancer Cohort Consortium (I4C), which involves a collaboration of birth cohorts in more than ten countries to obtain prospective evidence on the causes of childhood cancer.

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