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We have set up a Panel of members of the public with experience of pregnancy and childbirth, as well as research, to help shape our studies. You can read about who they are here.

 

PPPI PANEL MEMBERS

KAYLEIGH BURTON

KAYLEIGH BURTON 

My formative background is in Primary Care Mental Health services and research. I have managed a number of clinical trials of complex interventions from the Clinical Trials Research Unit at the University of Leeds, mostly in the mental health field. My own journey of becoming a parent included four long years conceiving and carrying to term several pregnancies. We very sadly lost four babies, prior to the birth of our eldest in 2014.  It was during maternity leave with our second ‘take-home’ baby that I decided to retrain and open my own business, offering antenatal and baby classes. I now support couples/families preparing for the arrival of their baby, and supporting them through the postnatal period. My aim is to ensure they feel confident, empowered and equipped with enough knowledge to enable them to make fully-informed decisions at every stage of their journey. Not all pregnancy and birth stories are straightforward and I see a wide cross-section of families experiencing varied issues. I will always signpost them to evidence-based sources so I’m really excited to contribute from my own professional and personal background to this important area of research.

 

LORRAINE PRYCE

LORRAINE PRYCE

I am a certified doula providing support and advocacy during pregnancy, childbirth and the early postpartum period for women and birthing people in the north of England, in Manchester, Leeds and Bradford. I am also a member of the Birthrights panel. This is collecting information and personal experiences of racial disparities in maternity care to understand why the risk to Black and brown women and birthing people and their babies of being harmed or dying in maternity, is four times higher than it is for white women. In 2021 I became a Birth Becomes You [hyperlink] Photographer, photographing women, parents and families in the moments around childbirth.  

I am interested in this project because I often bear witness to the impact that CTG monitoring can have on labouring women and people. I want to help ensure that the information it generates, helps to inform decision-making for the birthing person whilst considering their needs and upholding their choices in birth. I also want to share and highlight the lived experiences of those most impacted by the process of CTG monitoring to improve experiences for everyone.

 

BEN WILLS

BEN WILLS

I work as a research officer for Sands, the stillbirth and neonatal death charity, helping to support research projects, especially with involving parents and family members in research. I spent five years sitting on funding panels for the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) assessing funding applications, making sure that researchers were fully involving patients and the public in their proposed projects.

As someone who was born extremely preterm, I have campaigned for the charity Bliss for many years and have been involved in regional and national NHS groups and PPPI in research groups for various initiatives and projects around maternity and neonatal care and research. My wife and I have also just had our first child, a baby boy. I am also currently finishing off my PhD studies exploring the use of algorithms and artificial intelligence (AI) in the study and communication of historical research, so the algorithmic aspect of the DECIDE study is of particular interest to me. 

 

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