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Maternal immune dysregulation seems to affect fetal or postnatal immune development. Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-associated disorder with an immune basis and is linked to atopic disorders in offspring. Here we show reduction of fetal thymic size, altered thymic architecture and reduced fetal thymic regulatory T (Treg) cell output in preeclamptic pregnancies, which persists up to 4 years of age in human offspring. In germ-free mice, fetal thymic CD4+ T cell and Treg cell development are compromised, but rescued by maternal supplementation with the intestinal bacterial metabolite short chain fatty acid (SCFA) acetate, which induces upregulation of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE), known to contribute to Treg cell generation. In our human cohorts, low maternal serum acetate is associated with subsequent preeclampsia, and correlates with serum acetate in the fetus. These findings suggest a potential role of acetate in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and immune development in offspring.

Original publication

DOI

10.1038/s41467-019-10703-1

Type

Journal article

Journal

Nat Commun

Publication Date

10/07/2019

Volume

10