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The Nuffield Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology invites you to MitOX 2017 - an annual meeting with talks on mitochondrial genetics, physiology, neurosciences and cancer.

MitOX 2017

MitOX 2017

Date: Friday 1st December 2017, 9.30am - 5.30pm

Venue: The Richard Doll Building, Old Road Campus, Headington, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7LF. 

Please join us for this one day meeting on the role of mitochondria in Health and Disease. We have high quality speakers attending, including:

  • Grahame Hardie (Dundee) - Biguanides , AMPK and cancer therapeutics
  • Joseph Bateman (Kings College) - Mitochondrial retrograde signalling in the nervous system
  • Heather Mortiboys (Sheffield) - Mitochondria in neurodegeneration; a realistic therapeutic target?
  • Andrew Murray (Cambridge) - Mitochondrial adaptations to high altitude in Himalayan Sherpas
  • Cara Tomas (Newcastle) & Jiaboa Xu (Oxford) - Metabolic biomarkers in ME/CFS 
  • Craig Lygate  (Oxford) - Cardioprotection by mitochondrial creatine kinase
  • Charles Affourtit (Plymouth) - Unravelling the unusual bioenergetics of pancreatic beta cells
  • Ivan Gout (UCL)   Protein CoAlation: a novel post-translational modification in redox regulation.
  • Rita Horvath (Newcastle) – Genes and disease mechanisms in mitochondrial translation deficiencies
  • Dunja  Aksentijevic (Kings College, London) Causal link between intracellular Na elevation and metabolic remodelling in cardiac hypertrophy

AGENDA

09.00        Registration

Session 1 Chair: Lisa Heather 

09.30        Welcome by Karl Morten (Oxford)

09.35         Craig Lygate (Oxford) - Cardioprotection by mitochondrial creatine kinase

10.00         Andrew Murray (Cambridge) - Mitochondrial adaptations to high altitude in Himalayan Sherpas

10.25         Tom Nicoll (MRC Harwell) Cardiac arrhythmia resulting from an accumulation of branched chain                                      amin acids in a mouse line with a mutation in Bcat2

10.40         Dunja  Aksentijevic (Kings College, London) Causal link between intracellular Na elevation and                                    metabolic remodelling in cardiac hypertrophy

11.05         Coffee

Session 2 Chair: Karl Morten (Oxford)

11.30         Charles Affourtit (Plymouth) - Unravelling the unusual bioenergetics of pancreatic beta cells

11.55         Patrick Pollard tribute prize for work in Cancer Metabolism.                                                                                                    Grahame Hardie (Dundee) - Biguanides, AMPK and cancer therapeutics

12.25         Jo Elson (Newcastle) - A novel approach for investigating mtDNA  variation in the context of complex                               disease

12.40         Cara Tomas (Newcastle) & Jiaboa Xu (Oxford) - Metabolic biomarkers in ME/CFS 

13.05         Lunch & Posters

Session 3    Chair: Jo Poulton (Oxford)

14.30         Joseph Bateman (Kings College) - Mitochondrial retrograde signalling in the nervous system

14.55         Heather Mortiboys (Sheffield) - Mitochondria in neurodegeneration; a realistic therapeutic target?

15.20         Rita Horvath (Newcastle) - Genes and disease mechanisms in mitochondrial translation deficiencies

15.45         Kenneth Pryde (Leicester) - Intra-mitochondrial proteolytic quality control selectively degrades                                          complex I in depolarized mitochondria to constrain ROS production if mitophagy fails.

16.00         Tea/Coffee

Session 4 Chair: Paul Potter (MRC, Harwell)

16.30         Ivan Gout (UCL) - Protein CoAlation: a novel post-translational modification in redox regulation      

16.55         Iain Johnston (Birmingham)-Selfish replication and cell-level selection explain complex                                                    tissue specific mtDNA segregation patterns

17.10         Eszter Dombi (Oxford) - Increased mitophagy and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) turnover in defects of                              mtDNA maintenance associated with severe neurodegenerative disease: towards new therapies

17.25         Alex Zhdanov (Cork) New bridge connecting mitochondria and translation: PolGX recruits the                                          mitochondrial p32 protein for ribosome biogenesis

17.40         Drinks & Poster Results and Prize Giving!

19.30         MitOX Dinner

 

Registration fee £30.00 (concessions £15.00), lunch and refreshments are included.  

Please register here

 

 

 

 

 


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