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A pioneering new charity dedicated to helping young people at risk of infertility has been set up by specialists from the Nuffield Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, the Institute of Research Studies at the University of Oxford, and the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

Nathan Crawford (centre) the first boy in the UK to have an operation (by NHS and Oxford University medics) to preserve some of his testicular tissue, with the hope he can have children later in life. © Ben Birchall/ Press Association
Nathan Crawford (centre) the first boy in the UK to have an operation (by NHS and Oxford University medics) to preserve some of his testicular tissue, with the hope he can have children later in life.

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